Why do pregnant midwives seek out hypnobirthing?

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It’s true that more and more pregnant midwives are seeking out hypnobirthing, but why?? Right here goes…. pregnant midwives seek out hypnobirthing for their own births because…. IT WORKS.

Here at bumps ‘n’ babies we don’t often feel the need to bang the drum for hypnobirthing, cos there’s no need to really. Bookings are on the increase mainly due to word of mouth and the fact that hypnobirthing is becoming more recognized as a good birth preparation course, plus the research also shows – IT WORKS.

Now there’s some folk out there that feel hypnobirthing white washes over the truth about giving birth. They feel we set women up for failure by focusing on normal birth without giving much focus to ‘the other stuff’ that ‘might happen’. They think that we don’t truly prepare women for all eventualities.

But let’s go back to the pregnant midwives here…

When a midwife becomes pregnant everyone expects her to just get on with it, people think  she won’t need to attend a birth prep course cos she knows everything there is to know about birth. It’s her job. She sees babies coming out of women’s bodies on a daily basis. She knows her options on where she can give birth. She’s aware of the statistics, research and clinical guidelines that will impact on the care she receives. She knows what can go wrong. In the eyes of many she is ‘fully prepared for all eventualities’. She has witnessed the full range of birth experiences, she knows what ‘might happen’, so why does she seek out hypnobirthing?? Because she knows hypnobirthing will improve her overall  experience of pregnancy and birth and that even if she does need some help from the docs to give birth, hypnobirthing will make a huge difference!

Giving women just statistics, facts, and telling them what can go wrong does not necessarily ‘prepare’ a woman to give birth. Women aren’t stupid, they’ve heard the word stillbirth, they know a percentage of women will need a caesarean section and that nothing is set in stone as to how things will go on the day they give birth. They know there’s a ‘thing’ called an epidural – if they want one they can ask for one.

We teach hypnobirthing because of the hypnosis element, it’s what we love the most. Throughout the course not only do we look at the physical aspect of giving birth, we also focus on the power of the mind and how this can shape a woman’s birth experience both physically and mentally.

We’re not knocking other birth preparation courses out there, hypnobirthing won’t be to everyone’s taste, the fact that women have a choice of birth prep courses out there is a good thing. Women helping other women to give birth and have a positive experience is what it’s all about. But the reason that we don’t focus on ‘all that other stuff’ is cos it brings about the beast that is fear, and the physical responses within the body when the sympathetic nervous system is triggered by fear are not helpful to pregnant and labouring women. This is fact.

We’ve taught many doctors as well as midwives, the medical bunch seem to benefit the most from hypnobirthing. Hypnobirthing gives them the confidence to believe they can give birth without assuming that they will almost certainly need some help, and we remind them of the findings of the birthplace study – that ‘giving birth is generally very safe.’

Someone asked me only the other day – How do you define that hypnobirthing ‘works’?

Good question. Onto the research…

Hypnobirthing is still a relatively new concept so there isn’t masses of research on it, however what research there is, is promising. Some of the research trials looked at birth outcomes, whilst others focused more on pain management.  The findings of several trials shows that although the normal birth rate remains roughly the same; there is a significant rise in the instrumental birth rate due to a significant drop in the caesarean section rate, basically more vaginal births happen with hypnobirthing!

What seems to be a recurrent theme is that the women that had attended a hypnosis for childbirth course such as hypnobirthing, regardless of whether or not they requested an epidural or needed some medical assistance to give birth, reported more positive birth experiences. In short – hypnobirthing rocks!

So (here comes the shameless plug in this blog post), just as we’ve embraced the power of hypnosis for birth we’ve also applied the same concept to our new breastfeeding workshops. We’ve given focus to the mind – body connection, which as most breastfeeding mothers will tell you cannot be underestimated. As well as teaching pregnant women about the principles of breastfeeding and addressing the technical hitches that MAY crop up along the way, such as sore nips, over inflated boobs etc.( you see we are keeping it real!)  we’ve also incorporated relaxation and breathing techniques, visualizations and affirmations, all to encourage the flow of the necessary hormones for a positive breastfeeding experience.

Our first breastfeeding workshop will be held at Cossham hospital, run by the lovely experienced midwife Katie, on the 22nd of November, 7-10pm.

So if you’re a pregnant midwife reading this and wondering whether you should seek out hypnobirthing, the answer is – hell yes!! As the saying goes – there’s more than one way to cook an egg and there’s more than one way to give birth, so why not hypnobirth!

 

Sharon xx

Top 5 Tips For The Aspiring Midwife

Screenshot_20160525-122450_1Hello future student Midwives! Just a little note to introduce myself –  My name is Kelly and I am a third year student midwife studying at UWE in Bristol.  I will be coming along to give a presentation at the bumps ‘n’ babies Aspiring Midwife Study Day on Saturday the 4th June at Cossham hospital. I’ll be talking about life as a student midwife to give you an insight to  – the academic side, clinical placements, expectations and realities etc. So jot down a list of any questions, concerns and queries that you might have and I will be more than happy to address them on the day.

There are just a few tickets left for this event that proved to be very popular last year, so join me, and midwives Sharon and Jade, to learn more about the journey to becoming a midwife.

Clink on this link for more info – Aspiring Midwife Study Day

Here are Kelly’s Top 5 Tips for the Aspiring Midwife

  • Looking after the public enables you to care for a variety of women and their families. During your placements expect the unexpected, and when situations arise always remain professional, treat everyone equally and most importantly keep yourself, your colleagues and your women and families safe.

 

  • Sexual health, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Loss and Parenthood are some of the most common, yet unique experiences women and families encounter in life. During your training and career as a midwife always remind yourself that although these experiences are common, normal and frequent to you, for the women this is their individualised, special and unique pregnancy so always be just as excited, enthusiastic and compassionate each time.

 

  • Prepare to be extremely tired – working shifts, meeting academic deadlines, social and family life are manageable but you have to be organised – you will get use to it over time!

 

  • Read, read and more reading –knowledge is power. Start with the simple things, NHS choices is a reliable source to get started on pregnancy pathways, terminology and the maternity services that are available. Familiarise yourself with the basics and then use midwifery textbooks such as Mayes and Myles midwifery for more in depth information.

 

  • As a student midwife always remember you are there to learn, to grow and to deliver a safe and professional service. Even if you have children of your own or have other midwifery experience – there is always something new and valuable to learn from each woman and from the midwives, be a sponge, and absorb it all!

Looking forward to meeting you all soon!

Kelly

xx

Bristol, the best place to have a baby!

clifton-suspension-bridge-balloons-bristolIn 2013 Bristol was named best city in the UK to live in. This came as no surprise to us Bristolians, we know we’ve got it pretty good living here. Just one look online at right move will tell you that many are flocking to our city to grab a piece of the action, flippin’ house prices going through the roof – arghh!!! So why do people love Bristol? Well it’s not just the place itself but the people: Us Bristolians are a pretty chilled out, unassuming lot.

When the one born every minute cameras set up camp in one of Bristol’s large obstetric units in 2014 we could see for ourselves how easy going the midwives were. We watched as they supported many women birthing their babies in water, standing up, on all fours, surrounded by bean bags, pillows and mats etc. Even HYPNOBIRTHING got a mention! Fair play to those midwives, as any midwife will tell you keeping birth as natural as possible on a busy, highly medicalised labour ward can be a challenge, it takes a fair bit of encouragement from the midwives to make this happen.

Across the city at the other large obstetric unit things were even more easy going. Yes it’s true; a therapy dog did in fact accompany a woman in labour as she birthed her baby on labour ward, and what a cracking birth partner he was!! Sitting quietly in the corner, no demanding cups of tea every half hour, no questioning ‘how long is this all gonna take’. Maybe we should replace all the dads with a lovely Labrador and see how well the women birth then. I’m sure the famous French male obstetrician Michel Odent would be up for that cos he’s not too keen on dads at the birth!

Meanwhile, a few floors up on the induction of labour unit, a couple decided to use their initiative to induce labour naturally. An overdue pregnant lady and her chap were caught having jiggy by one of the cleaners. Brilliant!! What gets them babies in also gets ‘em out!  News of this reached America to the famous birth guru Ina May Gaskin who was also really impressed. She said on her facebook page “Good for St Michaels hospital in Bristol. The prostaglandins in semen can be most effective in starting labour. I hope it worked for this couple and thought the reporter should have found out!” Ha, her comment was liked by over 4k of her followers!

The daily mail got a hold of both of these stories and the readers were quick to leave their thoughts in the comments section no doubt thinking that us Bristolian midwives are completely bonkers. No we’re not bonkers, just open minded.

You’ve also got a great choice of where to give birth in Bristol. Over the last 3 years many babies have been born at the brand spanking new Cossham birth centre. The first baby girl born there in 2013 was a bumpsnbabies hypnobaby! Read Andrea’s birth story here.

And both the major obstetric units in the city have also opened new midwife led birth suites alongside their labour wards because research shows that a relaxing home from home environment with care from supportive midwives encourages the birth process. 4946776-large

This month the St Michael’s midwife led unit officially opened by the late Lynda Bellingham back in June 2013 was ranked top in the country for it’s maternity services!! How proud are we!!

Of course let’s not forget home birth too. I know of a few roads in Bristol that are ‘hot spots’ for home births, keeping those community midwives busy!!

Bristol is also a mum and baby friendly place to be, which is a good thing cos it’s a city literally full of bumps ‘n’ babies. As you walk down North street in Bedminster you feel like you’re on some sort of assault course negotiating all the pregnant women and buggies. The tobacco factory, bubbahub and the hungry caterpillar are just some of the many breastfeeding friendly cafes in the area; you’ll often see a babe on the boob as mumma sups a latte. No need to head off to the loo to breastfeed here. And no wonder the women here are happy to get their ‘Bristols’ out because did you know that in 2010 Bristol was the first city ever in the UK to receive the prestigious UNICEF baby friendly award for promoting and supporting breastfeeding mothers. Go Bristol!!!

And for those of you wondering why boobs are called Bristols, well here’s your answer, its good ol’ cockney rhyming slang for ‘titties’  ‘A fine pair of Bristols Cities’ = ‘titties’. What is that all about? How does a bloke manage to link the football team Bristol City with women’s boobs?

A few other Bristol things to rave about:

The fab free positive birth meet ups for expectant parents and anyone else interested in the world of birth.

Bristol’s street art, even that happens to be mum and baby friendly, this one by artist El Mac is obviously our fav! street art

So there you have it, just a few reasons why Bristol is the best city to have a baby, but shhhh don’t tell everyone, especially those from the big smoke thinking of relocating to a smaller city cos did I mention the housing market here? and for us midwives at bumpsnbabies trying to move house right now it’s a bloody nightmare!!

Sharon x

http://www.bumpsnbabies.org

10 things a midwife has heard many times

 

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  • ‘Never again!’   The classic phrase muttered by many women usually in the throes of labour. Of course us midwives believe you, even though we know you’ll be back again for baby number 2, 3, 4, 5.
  • ‘We don’t care whether it’s a boy or a girl, as long as it’s not ginger!’  Said with true conviction by many a mum or dad-to-be, please remember though there are ginger midwives within ear shot!!
  • ‘I think the parking ticket has expired’   A popular phrase said by the dads . The parking, that one job he has to take care of as the woman has the momentous task of birthing a tiny human. No don’t leave her just as the baby’s crowning to sort it out, she won’t thank you for it!
  • ‘This stuff is frickin’ amazing!’  Said by the woman who has just been handed the gas and air, and yes she is right!! Who ever came up with this wonder drug is a hero, we salute you!
  • ‘Don’t put it on facebook …!!’  Said by both new parents to the mother-in-law as she takes it upon herself to announce the new arrival to the whole world via social media before the woman’s even had chance to birth her placenta and put her knickers back on.
  • ‘But what if I poo?’  Said by the mum-to-be in early labour. The midwife’s response – ‘You might, you might not, don’t worry about it, sometimes in life sh*t just happens….!’
  • ‘I’m not looking forward to having a poo!’  Said by many a new mum on the postnatal ward. Midwife’s response – It’ll be fine, trust us, once that first post birth poo is passed everything seems right with the world.
  • ‘When can I go home?’  Said by the excited first time mum with a newborn just a few hours old that hasn’t quite got the hang of breastfeeding yet. As opposed to ‘How long can I stay?’  Said by the mother of baby number 4 who has a pile of washing waiting for her at home, along with 3 other kids and a hubby that all want feeding.
  • ‘Pass me a nappy, no they’re not in that bag, they’re in the other bag, no not there, more towards the left under the sleep suits, no that’s a vest not a sleepsuit!’  Said by many a new mum to her hubby as she recovers in bed with a baby attached to her boob. Word of advice from us midwives – get the hubby to pack the birth bags, then he’ll know where everything is!
  • ‘God I’ve had such a great night sleep on this busy postnatal ward’ – Said no new mum EVER!!!

 

Sharon x

http://www.bumpsnbabies.org

Midwife approved list of what to pack in your hospital bag

hospital bag

Giving birth is an unpredictable event; usually you don’t know when it’ll happen, or how long it’ll take. You might get lucky and have a super speedy labour and not need much from the list we’ve compiled below, but our motto is that of the Girl Guides – ‘Always be prepared!’

For you

Your iPod/pad/phone AND CHARGER!!! With the hypnobirthing tracks on them of course!!! Also make your own playlist in case you fancy something a bit more energetic, something by the prodigy maybe??!!

Fresh water in a sports bottle Don’t bother faffing around with a plastic cup and straw or you’ll likely end up with the straw rammed up your nostril and a face full of water mid contraction!

Jelly babies The instant pick me up when your energy levels are flagging, midwives love a jelly baby on a night shift too! 🙂

Food for him You never know how long your labour will take and a hungry birth partner = a grumpy birth partner, so pack some of his favourite snacks to keep him going otherwise he’ll be ringing his mum to drop by with some sandwiches

Isotonic drinks Just in case the vending machine is out of order, pack a few bottles

Bikini for the birth pool Us midwives have seen it all before but this whole  ‘getting your kit off’ in front of strangers is probably a new thing for you (probably), so just wear whatever is most comfortable for you, bikini, bathing suit, birthday suit, whatever.

Yoga mat A tad controversial this one, it’s for the men to have a snooze on if they’re super tired and the only option is the floor.  No he won’t be snoozing at that crucial moment when you’re birthing his baby, but he might just need 40 winks before the drive home maybe?

Hair band The good ol’ 90’s scrunchy is the best otherwise your other half is rummaging around in your make bag looking for your hair bobble for an eternity.

Change for the car park  Yes you need to take out a small mortgage these days for hospital parking but if you ask nicely you might be entitled to a free pass, worth a go!

Your birth plan.  Laminated, with key points highlighted (only joking) make sure you give it to the midwife looking after you.

Lip balm Gas and air = dry lips, nuff said

Flannel Yes it’s not just something we midwives suggested in the good old days, women in labour these days still need their brows mopped with a cool damp flannel!

Warm socks We’ve lost count of the number of women we’ve looked after in labour that have stripped off completely bar their socks! Must be something to do with blood flow going to the uterus leaving the extremities cold maybe?

Hot water bottle Great to put on your lower back or under the bump to ease any cramping. Be warned the midwives might not be able to re-fill it (due to elf ‘n’ safety) but if that’s the case ask if they have any heat packs you can use instead.

Big pants and proper brick like sanitary pads. Panty liners just won’t cut it if your waters have gone nor will they just after you’ve had the bubba – think 9 months of periods all in one go, gross but true. You could also try the TENA lady incontinence pants (we won’t judge you honest!) Oh and leave those lacy thongs at home, only big, baggy dark pants will do, yes motherhood is sexy!

Tracky bottoms (dark ones obvs.) and a zip up hoody for after the birth. Much comfier than jeans and teamed with a zip up top = easy access for breastfeeding and you’ll be looking bang on trend on the postnatal ward!

Flip flops  There’s just something a bit grannyish about plodding around a hospital in your slippers don’t you think? Flip flops can also be worn in the shower.

Lansinoh nipple cream Pricey but so worth it, put a smidge on after every feed keeps ‘em super soft and keeps the cracks at bay

Pillows.  There’s either a tone of pillows on labour ward or none at all, so to be sure best to bring your own, maybe sprinkle a few drops of lavender oil on them for added relaxation.

Nursing bras, and maybe a few breast pads too in case you’re ‘that woman’ with an abundance of breast milk and could easily nurse all the babies on the ward and still have some left over.

Toiletry bag with  shower gel, deodorant, shampoo & conditioner (do they still make wash and go??) and BB cream, well you wanna be looking glam for those post birth photos don’t you?!

 

For baby

Disposable nappies Even if you’ve invested in the washable ones, for infection control reasons just use disposable nappies whilst in hospital.

Cotton wool For cleaning baby’s bottom, wipes can be a tad harsh on their peachy cheeks initially, so best to save the wipes for a few days down the line if you can.

Vests, sleep suits, and a hat. Yes the pink frilly Dior dress is adorable but trust us, for those first few days it’s all about being practical and although the poppers will drive you a bit insane at 3am the sleep suit is the way to go for practicality.

 A nice warm blanket Yes the knitted ones are very classy but the warmest are those cheap fleece ones from Matalan, honest!

 

  • Top Tips – Make full use of the NHS linen, i.e. towels, cot sheets and baby blankets. It’ll save you the hassle of packing and washing your own!
  • Pack a little treat for yourself, maybe a mini bottle of prosecco??, or a scrumptious bar of chocolate?? after all you’re the one that’s done all the hard work, congratulations, you rock!!

Sharon , Katheryn & Jade xxx

An English Midwife in Spain

a brit abroadHow did this happen? This was not the plan. The plan was to work in a bar, pull a few pints and take it easy. I’d only been qualified and working as a midwife for just 18 months in the U.K when I decided I’d had enough. After three years of intense training, being skint and then the dreaded first year as a newly qualified midwife I just couldn’t be arsed with it anymore. Sod it I thought, sod the student loan repayments I’m off to Spain to live with my parents. The Costa Blanca, now we’re talking! Sun, sea, sand, and not a labouring woman in sight – bliss! In hindsight I was probably burnt out but didn’t realise at the time.

After a few months of winding down and working on the tan the plan changed… There was a new hospital being built in the area. Would they need midwives I wondered? Turns out they did, and the fact that I spoke English was a bonus due to the large number of English speaking Europeans living in the area. So there I was being interviewed for a job as a midwife through a translator because did I mention that I couldn’t speak Spanish? Yeah that’s right, not a word, nada!

So lucky me was offered a job and told to learn as much Spanish as possible over the next six months before the hospital opened. Yeah no probs I can do that I thought. Now I did my best in those six months trying to learn the lingo, swotting up all day everyday but there was no getting away from the fact that my Spanish was crap, I mean really crap. And now here I was on my first day having my photo taken for my ID badge. They say every picture tells a story, that photo says it all, the look of terror on my face! How was I gonna pull this off?

Fortunately there were others there in the same boat as me – mostly doctors, from all over Europe. Clinging to our translation dictionaries somehow we all got by and made ourselves understood one way or another and thankfully there wasn’t reams of paperwork to fill out like there is in the U.K. Our Spanish colleagues were lovely people with a lot of patience; I’ll never forget how kind they were towards me cos no doubt I drove them up the bloody wall most days.

Of course over time things got easier, I even became useful and was called upon as a translator if an English speaking patient was on the unit. Usually the classic English tourist – sunburnt, and shouting loudly in English hoping that the Spanish doctor would suddenly understand them if they shouted the same sentence several times, each time a bit louder. I could probably write a whole book about my time as a midwife in Spain, (no plans to) but there was one particular night shift on labour ward that comes to me now and again, along with the realisation that no matter what language is spoken words are just that – words, and actually maybe we all talk way too much. Talk is cheap, actions speak louder than words, you get the gist.

So I worked mostly day shifts but was asked if I could cover a night shift for a midwife who was off sick. It was a quiet evening, there were two of us midwives and two maternity assistants lounging in the staff room, nibbling on pipas whilst watching the Spanish version of ‘wheel of fortune’ (crap TV game shows in every country!) The only obstetrician on that night arrived to announce that the last patient on her list that she had seen in antenatal clinic needed her labour inducing. She was off to the doctors’ rest room to be called only if there was problem.

It was my turn to do some work. Within the hour the woman was in a hospital gown, on the monitor, with a hormone drip flowing through her veins to get her contractions going. No husband or birth partner with her, so it was just me and her and here’s the thing – she was Moroccan. She couldn’t speak Spanish or English and I couldn’t speak Arabic, so we communicated with the odd hand gesture and the occasional smile or nod.

With the lights off I curled up on a chair next to the bed near to the monitor. In the dark all you could hear was the baby’s heart beat, and the woman quietly chanting what I guessed was a prayer? An affirmation? Something from the Quran? Whatever it was it sent me into a chilled out trance. I gave her the occasional smile, offered her some water now and again and squeezed her hand to hopefully reassure her all was well. No words. After a few hours things hotted up, her contractions got stronger, she rolled from side to side and her chanting got loader. Then suddenly she looked me right in the eye and said something to me in Arabic which I guessed was ‘it’s coming?’ I lifted up her sheet and there were signs that she was ready to give birth so I called the maternity assistants and we moved her into the ‘birthing room’. This wasn’t her first baby, she started pushing, she knew instinctively what to do. Just the odd smile and nod from me. I caught the baby and put him in her arms. All straight forward, no problems and within half an hour the maternity assistants had cleaned her up, the baby was feeding at the breast, and she was ready for the ward. As she was wheeled passed me on her bed she leaned out and grabbed my arm, she looked me intensely in the eye and held my gaze for a moment. She smiled and said something in Arabic which I guessed was ‘thank you’ and then she was gone.

You know where I’m going with all this…… a woman in labour with a midwife by her side. They barely spoke yet a baby was born. All was well, the woman seemed happy with her care. Maybe the fact that we couldn’t speak to each other meant that she could focus more on herself, and switch off the thinking part of her brain which allowed her to labour better? (AKA Hypnobirthing). Some of you reading this will probably think, Yeah but what if something had gone wrong? Where was her informed consent? What about the lengthy discussions about the pros and cons of induction and what research backs up the evidence and the guidelines? What about litigation??? blah blah blah! I don’t know. Everyone will have their opinions on what’s right and wrong, but what I do know is that I remember that night shift, I remember the whole ‘not talking thing’ and it felt right, it felt peaceful, and sometimes I wish there could be more days when there is just less talk.

Sharon x

Here’s me and the only other English midwife with our lovely boss. Looking more tanned and healthy than your average NHS midwife in the UK!

midwives in spain

So you want to be a midwife?

wanna be midwifeI was recently contacted by someone who wants to be a midwife and I have been wondering what to say to her. Midwifery training is incredibly popular at the moment, no doubt thanks in part to Call The Midwife and One Born Every Minute.  I have lost count of the number of people who have said to me ‘I would love to do your job…’ with a wistful look in their eye.  At our local university over 1,000 people applied for the 70 spaces available on the next Midwifery course.

But I wonder if there is any other job that is so romanticized and where the harsh reality of life on the shop floor is so different to what we hope for?

I don’t think people always fully appreciate the enormous RESPONSIBILITY that you have as a midwife.  At times it can feel overwhelming.  You are responsible not only for the health and safety of that woman but also for her baby.  You may be responsible for a baby dying or being severely disabled.  Just let that sink in for a moment, it’s quite a big deal huh?

Sometimes, despite the best care babies can be born in an unexpectedly poor condition and I know of several very good midwives that have been involved in these tragic cases. This involves investigations, court cases, a very hard and long process before their name is cleared.

Childbirth is a natural, normal function that is a momentous event for a woman and her family.  But in the litigation fearing, policy following, hugely overworked, overstretched and understaffed NHS then this can often feel lost.

The heartbreaking fact for midwives is that if you have only 15 mins per antenatal appointment, have to do 13 postnatal visits in a morning, look after 10 women and babies on a postnatal ward, catch 3 babies on a night shift then you just simply can not give the care that you know these women and babies deserve. Meanwhile you are answering endless phone calls, buzzers, doorbells, doing reams of paperwork, hunting for missing equipment, mopping blood up, chasing social workers, teaching students…

All of this in a twelve hour shift without time even for a wee and only a handful of Quality Street to eat all day.  Working loads of weekends, night shifts, Christmas Day, New Years Eve.  Still want to do it?  Have I put you off yet?

I decided I wanted to be a midwife when I saw a baby being born whilst training as a student nurse, fresh out of school. I was just 18 and it was the most amazing thing I had ever seen.  Like a magic trick, a baby appearing out of a woman’s body.  I have lost count of the number of babies I have seen born since then, it must be several hundred.  And do you know what?  I still find it as exciting as that first time I saw it.  When you see that tiny scrap of hair, that new life emerging, knowing that you are the first person to see this new person, it never loses its thrill.

Yes it’s hard work and nothing like the ‘lovely’ job people often imagine it to be but I still want to be a midwife.

If you think you’d like to be a midwife click to find out more about our aspiring midwife study day.

Also check out this great website for aspiring midwives and student midwives www.studentmidwife.net

Katheryn x

http://www.bumpsnbabies.org